American teen pop culture statistics 2005

http://www.sadd.org/

 


Underage Drinking
  • In 2005, about 10.8 million persons ages 12-20 (28.2% of this age group) reported drinking alcohol in the past month. Nearly 7.2 million (18.8%) were binge drinkers, and 2.3 million (6.0%) were heavy drinkers.
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Three out of every four students (75%) have consumed alcohol (more than just a few sips) by the end of high school.
    2005 Monitoring the Future
  • More than half (58%) of 12th graders report having been drunk at least once in their life. One fifth (20%) of 8th graders report having been drunk at least once in their life.
    2005 Monitoring the Future

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Impaired Driving

  • Motor vehicle crashes remain the number one cause of death among youth ages 15-20. There were 7,460 youth motor vehicle deaths in 2005. (This includes both drivers and passengers.)
    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


     
  • Twenty-eight percent (28%) of 15- to 20-year-old drivers who were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2005 had been drinking.
    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


     
  • For young drivers (15-20 years old), alcohol involvement is higher among males than among females. In 2005, 24% of the young male drivers involved in fatal crashes had been drinking at the time of the crash, compared with 12% of the young female drivers involved in fatal crashes.
    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


     
  • Drivers are less likely to use seat belts when they have been drinking. In 2005, 64% of the young drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal crashes who had been drinking were unrestrained. Of the young drivers who had been drinking and were killed in crashes, 74% were unrestrained.
    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

     

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Traffic Safety

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Tobacco

  • Nationwide, 15.2% of the 19.1% students who reported current cigarette use and were under 18 years old usually got their own cigarettes by buying them in a store or gas station during the last 30 days.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Among the 12.9% of students nationwide who tried to buy cigarettes in a store during the 30 days preceding the survey, 48.5% of students were not asked to show proof of age.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

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Drug Use

  • In 2005, 9.9% of youths ages 12-17 were current illicit drug users: 6.8% used marijuana, 3.3% used prescription drugs for nonmedicinal purposes, 1.2% used inhalants, 0.8% used hallucinogens, and 0.6% used cocaine.
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Two fifths of 8th graders (41%) and almost three fourths of all 10th graders (73%) consider marijuana easily accessible; compare these figures with the percentage of 12th graders – 86%.
    2005 Monitoring the Future
  • In 2005, 15.5% of youths ages 12-17 indicated that they had been approached by someone selling drugs in the past month. Youth who reported being approached by someone selling drugs were more likely to have used an illicit drug in their lifetime (61.3% vs. 21.5%), in the past year (51.2% vs. 14.1%) and in the past month (32.6% vs. 5.8%).
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Youths ages 12-17 who believed their parents would strongly disapprove of their using a particular substance were less likely to use that substance than were youths who believed their parents would somewhat disapprove or neither approve nor disapprove.
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Sixty-two percent (62%) of the nation’s high schoolers – some 10.6 million – and 28% of middle schoolers (2.4 million) will go to schools where drugs are used, kept, or sold.
    2005 CASA National Survey

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Exposure to Prevention Programming

  • Approximately one in eight youths ages 12-17 (11.7%) reported in 2005 that participating in drug, tobacco, or alcohol prevention programs outside of school in the past year. The prevalence of past month alcohol use was lower among youths who reported participating in these programs, 14.0%, than among youths who did not, 16.9%.
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Almost four fifths (77.9%) of youths ages 12-17 enrolled in school reported in 2005 they had seen or heard drug or alcohol prevention messages at school in the past year. Past month use of an illicit drug was lower for youths exposed to such messages (9.2%) than for youths not reporting such exposure (13.2%).
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health

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Violence

  • Nationwide, 18.5% of high school students had carried a weapon (gun, knife, or club) one or more days in the last 30 days. The prevalence of having carried a weapon was higher among male (29.8%) than female (7.1%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Nationwide, 6.0% of students had not gone to school on 1 or more days of the last 30 days because they felt they would be unsafe at school or on their way to or from school.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

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Mental Health

  • In 2005, there were 3.4 million youths ages 12-17 years old (13.7% of 12- to 17-year-olds) who had at least one Major Depressive Episode (MDE) in their lifetime and 2.2 million youths (8.8%) who had MDE during the past year.
    2005 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • Nationwide, 16.9% of high school students had seriously considered attempting suicide during the past year. Overall, the prevalence of having seriously considered attempting suicide was higher among female (21.8%) than male (12.0%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Nationwide, 8.4% of high school students had actually attempted suicide one or more times during the past year. Overall, the prevalence of having actually attempted suicide was higher among female (10.8%) than male (6.0%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

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Eating Disorders

  • During the last 30 days, 6.3% of students nationwide had taken diet pills, powders, or liquids without a doctor’s advice to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Nationwide, 4.5% of students had vomited or taken laxatives to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight during the last 30 days. Overall the prevalence of having vomited or taken laxatives to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight was higher among female (6.2%) than male (2.8%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

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Sexual Activity

  • Currently 46.8% of all high school students report they have had sexual intercourse. The percentage of high school students who have had sex decreased 13.3% between 1991 and 2005 (54% to 46.8%).
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Nationwide, 6.2% of high school students had had sexual intercourse for the first time before age 13. Overall, the prevalence of having had sexual intercourse before age 13 was higher among male (8.8%) than female (3.7%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Nationwide, 14.3% of high school students had had sexual intercourse with four or more persons during their life. Overall, the prevalence of having had sexual intercourse with four or more persons was higher among male (16.5%) than female (12.0%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Among the 33.9% of currently sexually active students nationwide, 62.8% reported that either they or their partner had used a condom during last sexual intercourse. Overall, the prevalence of having used a condom during last sexual intercourse was higher among male (70.0%) than female (55.9%) students.
    2005 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance
  • Youth exposed to sexual content on television were more likely to overestimate the frequency of sexual activity among peers and more likely to have more permissive attitudes toward premarital sex.
    2005 ASHA State of the Nation

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Teen Pregnancy

  • Three in ten teenage girls (31%) become pregnant at least once before they reach the age of 20 – more than 750,000 teen pregnancies a year. Eight in ten of these pregnancies are unintended and 81% are to unmarried teens.
    National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy


     
  • The U.S. teen pregnancy rate for teens ages 15-19 decreased 36% between 1990 and 2002.
    National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy


     
  • Despite impressive declines over the past decade, the United States still has the highest rates of teen pregnancy and births in the Western industrialized world. Teen pregnancy costs the United States at least $7 billion annually.
    National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

     
  • A majority of both girls and boys who are sexually active wish they had waited. Of those who have had sex, more than one half of teen boys (55%) and the majority of teen girls (70%) said they wish they had waited longer to have sex.
    National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

     

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STDs

  • Nineteen (19) million new STD infections occur each year, almost half of them among young people ages 15 to 24.
    Centers for Disease Control
  • Forty percent (40%) of older adolescents surveyed by the Kaiser Family Foundation incorrectly believe that the contraceptive “pill” and “shot” protect against STDs and HIV.
    2005 ASHA State of the Nation
  • Some young people, including those who had abstinence education, consider oral and anal sex to be abstinent behaviors and do not realize these behaviors present risks of STD transmission.
    2005 ASHA State of the Nation
  • Adolescents believed they are tested during routine medical examinations for major STDs: chlamydia, gonorrhea, HIV, hepatitis B, herpes, HPV, syphilis, and trichomoniasis.
    2005 ASHA State of the Nation

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HIV/AIDS

  • In 2004, an estimated 4,883 people ages 13-24 received a diagnosis of HIV infection or AIDS, representing about 13% of the people given a diagnosis that year.
    Centers for Disease Control
  • African-Americans were disproportionately affected by HIV infection, accounting for 55% of all HIV infections reported among young persons ages 13-24.
    Centers for Disease Control
  • In 2004, an estimated 7,761 young people were living with AIDS, a 42% increase since 2000, when 5,457 young people were living with AIDS.
    Centers for Disease Control

 

 

Ref.   http://www.soundvision.com/Info/teens/stat.asp

 

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